Coffee Table

Coffee table is made from the trim of the old doors we’ve replaced. The top is the 6″ wide casings and the apron is made from the trim. The legs are two pieces of trim glued together. The piece has the natural distressed look from the nail holes and dings from the 100 year old doors.

Coffee Table

Coffee Table

Coffee Table

Coffee Table

Coffee Table

Coffee Table

5 Panel Picture Canvas

5 Panel Door Canvas

Using a 5 panel door from old home, we trimmed the edges to square and stripped the clear coat finish, sanded, and applied a darker stain. Once the stain dried, we applied a barn red craft-barrel paint and rubbed and wiped it in much like the stain procedure.

The shelf is made from the doors casing and the small apron beneath the shelf is the door stop from the jam. We a 1/8″ groove an inch from the edge of the shelf to hold small items we may lean against the canvas.

We plan to stagger 5×7 picture frames on each panel with photos of our family. This unit is hanging with a heavy gage wire from two wood screws mounted in two separate studs. The wire is connected to the door with eye screws.

5 Panel Headboard

Door Headboard

We converted this 5 panel door into a headboard for our king size bed.

Method:

The edge where the hinges were mounted was trimmed to a smooth edge. The top and bottom were measured to equal lengths and trim to square. 4×4 post were mounted to the top and bottom of the door which when turned horizontal became the sides of the headboard. The post were screwed in with 4″ wood screws and counter sunk and topped off with a wooden button.

The headboard has 3 coats of semi-gloss enamel from Sherwin-Williams. The paint and construction has held up wonderfully. The headboard does not rock or knock against the wall. It is very sturdy and attractive.

Console Table

Wood taken from the door casings and jams in our 1921 home was used to construct this table. When we purchased our home in 2006 there were 3 variations of trim throughout the house. Wanting to bring uniformity to our home, we’ve decided to update room by room and replace the variety of trim work with eight inch colonial baseboard, fluted door casing with rosettes and 3 inch crown molding.

Storing the old trim in our basement for several years, I decided tomake use of it by making a few pieces of needed furniture.

Method:

Trimmed the rounded corners to square and joined the wider pieces together using the Kreg jig and¬†pocket-holes. Gluing and clamping the more narrow pieces together made perfect dimensions for legs. Sanding and finishing the piece with stains and polyurethane I’ve had for a number of years produced a nice looking, solid wood, custom piece of usable furniture.